The Second Battle for Sakhalin


The first battle for Sakhalin took place in 2006 and was between the foreign partners in the Sakhalin-2 project—Shell, Mitsui and Mitsubishi—and Gazprom and the Russian Government. Riding a high tide of resource nationalism, President Putin was determined to see Russian control of this massive integrated oil and gas project. Gazprom walked away with 50% plus one share of the project, and the rest is history. The second battle for Sakhalin is part of the on-going struggle between Gazprom and Rosneft for dominance in Russia’s energy scene. At the heart of the conflict is the question of how best to develop the next phase of Sakhalin’s gas exports. At present the two combatants are well dug in and no compromise is in sight. However, in an increasingly competitive Asian LNG market the current stalemate can only damage the prospects for both sides.
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Russian Sanctions Threaten its Oil Exploration Future


The latest antics by Russia in Ukraine raise some harsh questions as to its future as the world’s (current) largest oil and gas producer. At the same time Russia’s actions highlight the relative stability of oil exploration within its former Cold War adversary, the United States.
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Protecting Your Oil & Gas Supplies and Costs Amidst Geopolitical Events


A few months ago, China missed growth targets, which as a result, lowered oil and gas demands. This news could have lowered prices if it weren’t for Russia’s decision to annex Crimea, which caused gas prices to increase. Reports about Russia’s annexation of Crimea make international news on a daily basis, and each blip creates serious ripples within the industry. As a business owner, it’s important to monitor the situation in Eurasia—even if you don’t conduct business in the region—as each market event elicits the butterfly effect across the industry.
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Russian Takeover Isolates Crimea, May Further Isolate Russia


Russian President Vladimir Putin has made great sport of mocking sanctions imposed by the United States and the European Union in the wake of his annexation of Crimea by force. That doesn’t mean the sanctions aren’t working or won’t work, going forward. And other results of Putin’s aggression may yet prove more surprising and isolating for Russia.
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